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 It is official: Lady Gaga, under threat from Islamic extremists, has canceled her June 3 concert in Jakarta. The concert has been the target of protest from the moment it was scheduled. Its cancelation is being chalked up as another victory for the Islamic Defenders Front, a radical group that has been described as vigilante and implicated in multiple instances of violence.
Lady Gaga, the most followed individual on Twitter, took to her social media accounts to express her disappointment about the cancelation. The pop star managed to stay classy and focused on her appreciation of fans in the archipelago nation:
"I will try to put together something special for you. My love for Indonesia has only grown. #GagaSendsLoveToJakarta and all its people.”
"We had to cancel the concert in Indonesia. I’m so very sorry to the fans & just as devastated as you if not more. You are everything to me."
"There is nothing Holy about hatred."
Fans also took to Twitter, often asking for Gaga to ignore the threat and continue with the performance.
The comments sections of Indonesia’s two major English language newspapers, the Jakarta Globe and the Jakarta Post, mostly expressed regret and frustration about the cancelation. Many posters focused on the inability of Indonesia’s security forces to provide protection and others lamented the blow to Indonesia’s reputation as a nation of moderate Islam. 
 Islamic Defenders Front spokesman stated he  “thanked God” for the cancellation, adding that the show “would only have been for stupid people.” 

It is official: Lady Gaga, under threat from Islamic extremists, has canceled her June 3 concert in Jakarta. The concert has been the target of protest from the moment it was scheduled. Its cancelation is being chalked up as another victory for the Islamic Defenders Front, a radical group that has been described as vigilante and implicated in multiple instances of violence.

Lady Gaga, the most followed individual on Twitter, took to her social media accounts to express her disappointment about the cancelation. The pop star managed to stay classy and focused on her appreciation of fans in the archipelago nation:

"I will try to put together something special for you. My love for Indonesia has only grown. #GagaSendsLoveToJakarta and all its people.”

"We had to cancel the concert in Indonesia. I’m so very sorry to the fans & just as devastated as you if not more. You are everything to me."

"There is nothing Holy about hatred."

Fans also took to Twitter, often asking for Gaga to ignore the threat and continue with the performance.

The comments sections of Indonesia’s two major English language newspapers, the Jakarta Globe and the Jakarta Post, mostly expressed regret and frustration about the cancelation. Many posters focused on the inability of Indonesia’s security forces to provide protection and others lamented the blow to Indonesia’s reputation as a nation of moderate Islam. 

Islamic Defenders Front spokesman stated he  “thanked God” for the cancellation, adding that the show “would only have been for stupid people.” 

Filed under Lady Gaga concert cancellation Twiiter Facebook Islam extremism social media online media irony social irony

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Read the I.O.C.’s Social Media policy and you can’t help but feel The Games are looking at the blogosphere as the Grinch who might steal the Olympics. With ad campaigns potentially costing 30-50 million dollars per sponsor, the policy is written to protect against unofficial advertising and broadcasting. The IOC is trying to keep control of the uncontrollable online frontier that leached profits from the music industry and is now nipping at the heels of television. 
Despite the threat, as any high-school teacher or individual not living under a rock could tell you, there is no keeping the tweets and Facebooking at bay. And considering the reach of social media, trying to do so would be foolish. Since the most recent Olympics, Facebook has added 745 million users and Twitter 134 million. Marketers acknowledge that ignoring social media is simply not an option. In turn, London 2012 has heeded the adage ‘if you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em’ and some are billing the event as the first “social games.”
There is both a Facebook and Twitter page for London 2012, the Paralymics, the Olympic mascot, the Paralympic mascot and the London 2012 festival. Each sporting event also has its own Twitter account. The I.O.C. has even launched its own social media site where fans can connect with athletes. 
The most interesting aspect of the Olympic strategy is the acknowledgment of social media’s dual role as promoter and reporter. The mascot accounts are used as a place of conversation and fan outreach. The London 2012 Twitter seems poised to keep followers up to date on Olympic happenings in real time.
Amongst sponsors, Adidas has reportedly had some of the furthest reach. The company designed the Team Great Britain uniforms, which are prominently featured on the Team GB Facebook page. They have created an impressive video campaign. Youtube and video have provided the medium and platform to promote the Games and leverage the brand’s credibility in urban life style markets.  Adidas is looking to use the Games to surpass Nike as the UK’s top provider of sports ware. 
Visa’s “Go World” campaign aims to create a “global cheer.” Followers can use the Visa Facebook app to “cheer” by clicking on sports and individual athletes. On Youtube, fans upload videos to show support for their favorite competitors. The credit card company plans to broadcast some of the most creative videos as advertisements during the games.
Samsung’s U.S. Olympic Genome Project lets you know which Olympians you have something in common. The app uses your Facebook profile to search out information like who amongst the competitors grew up in your town, and could tell you if that ex who disappeared only did so she could focus on her table tennis career.
According a report by Reuters, advertisers are spending 15-20 percent of their budgets on digital media. Brands are also doing their best to calculate the cash value of a Facebook ‘like’ and a re-tweet.
The Internet and social media have developed in the hands of the consumer.  Leveraging social media for marketing is still a game that is being figured out. Considering the effort expended by brands to win the attention of customers, this competition may be one of London 2012’s most interesting and historic.

Read the I.O.C.’s Social Media policy and you can’t help but feel The Games are looking at the blogosphere as the Grinch who might steal the Olympics. With ad campaigns potentially costing 30-50 million dollars per sponsor, the policy is written to protect against unofficial advertising and broadcasting. The IOC is trying to keep control of the uncontrollable online frontier that leached profits from the music industry and is now nipping at the heels of television. 

Despite the threat, as any high-school teacher or individual not living under a rock could tell you, there is no keeping the tweets and Facebooking at bay. And considering the reach of social media, trying to do so would be foolish. Since the most recent Olympics, Facebook has added 745 million users and Twitter 134 million. Marketers acknowledge that ignoring social media is simply not an option. In turn, London 2012 has heeded the adage ‘if you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em’ and some are billing the event as the first “social games.”

There is both a Facebook and Twitter page for London 2012, the Paralymics, the Olympic mascot, the Paralympic mascot and the London 2012 festival. Each sporting event also has its own Twitter account. The I.O.C. has even launched its own social media site where fans can connect with athletes. 

The most interesting aspect of the Olympic strategy is the acknowledgment of social media’s dual role as promoter and reporter. The mascot accounts are used as a place of conversation and fan outreach. The London 2012 Twitter seems poised to keep followers up to date on Olympic happenings in real time.

Amongst sponsors, Adidas has reportedly had some of the furthest reach. The company designed the Team Great Britain uniforms, which are prominently featured on the Team GB Facebook page. They have created an impressive video campaign. Youtube and video have provided the medium and platform to promote the Games and leverage the brand’s credibility in urban life style markets.  Adidas is looking to use the Games to surpass Nike as the UK’s top provider of sports ware. 

Visa’s “Go World” campaign aims to create a “global cheer.” Followers can use the Visa Facebook app to “cheer” by clicking on sports and individual athletes. On Youtube, fans upload videos to show support for their favorite competitors. The credit card company plans to broadcast some of the most creative videos as advertisements during the games.

Samsung’s U.S. Olympic Genome Project lets you know which Olympians you have something in common. The app uses your Facebook profile to search out information like who amongst the competitors grew up in your town, and could tell you if that ex who disappeared only did so she could focus on her table tennis career.

According a report by Reuters, advertisers are spending 15-20 percent of their budgets on digital media. Brands are also doing their best to calculate the cash value of a Facebook ‘like’ and a re-tweet.

The Internet and social media have developed in the hands of the consumer.  Leveraging social media for marketing is still a game that is being figured out. Considering the effort expended by brands to win the attention of customers, this competition may be one of London 2012’s most interesting and historic.

Filed under London 2012 Olympics Adidas Samsung Visa sports athletics social media online media irony social irony